How To Train Your Dog Not To Jump

How to train your dog not to jump on you

Since dogs are shorter than you, their natural tendency is to jump up to see you. It is also an expression of happiness. However, you may be wearing your good clothes, the dog’s paws may be muddy and some people may be afraid of dogs. Keep reading on how to train your dog not to jump up on people.

So, it is a good idea to train your dog not to jump on people. If you don’t mind your dog jumping on you, then train it to jump on you only when it’s “OK” to do so. In general, correct it immediately when it jumps on you.

Try to anticipate the jumping, look for their hindquarters beginning to crouch down, and correct them when you see them about to jump. You should note that some dogs do not respond to physical corrections.

They may view it as a form of rough play, or be so happy to get attention that they don’t mind it being negative. In these cases, make the dog SIT in front of you every time it greets you (use food as a motivation). This will replace the jumping up and don’t forget to praise once it has sat.

Train Your Dog The Correct Way

Gradually expand this to include friends and visitors. Start first with people who understand what you want to achieve and will apply the SIT when greeted by the dog. Then apply physical correction in conjunction with your “No!” if the dog jumps up.

A good exercise is to put your dog on a leash, and stand on one end of the leash or otherwise secure it so your dog can stand but not jump, correct it for attempting to jump.

Praise The Dog If It Only Sits.

For those of you who don’t mind being jumped on, you can gain control over it by teaching your dog that it can jump on you — when you OK it. You can do this by calling the dog up on you repeatedly (I use the command “HUG”), every time the dog jumps “up”, push it down and say “NO” or “Down”, on about the seventh time say “Hug” praise the dog for jumping up.

All the people I teach this too, say it must be confusing for the dog. What you are doing is developing a hesitating jump and after a while the dog will only jump on your command. Wean the praise gradually down to the sixth time, then to the fourth and so on.

Practice this every day for two weeks and at the end of the two weeks you will be able to call your dog up for a “HUG”, and the dog should only jump now when it is told. At other times, when it is *not* trying to jump on you, encourage it to do so on your permission, using the same phrase. You must make it clear that it shouldn’t jump on you unless you give it permission, so you must still correct a non permitted jumping.

EG.

“Up” when the dog jumps up “No”
“Hug” when the dog jumps up “Good boy”
“Up” when the dog jumps up “No”
“Up” when the dog jumps up “No”
“Up” when the dog jumps up “No”
“Hug” when the dog jumps up “Good boy”
“Up” when the dog jumps up “No”
“Up” when the dog jumps up “No”
“Up” when the dog jumps up “No”
“Up” when the dog jumps up “No”
“Up” when the dog jumps up “No”
“Up” when the dog jumps up “No”
“Hug” when the dog jumps up “Good boy”

If you keep the command “Hug” varied then the dog will wait for this command and no matter how much you ask your dog “Up” it will wait. You don’t have to use the same commands as I do, you can choose your own commands.

This article is bought to you by Dog Grooming Frankston

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